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Snowbirds – we get it!

Fall migration is underway. Like many Canadians, a lot of bird species prefer to spend their winters in warmer climes, often for the simple reason that food is more abundant there than it is here. Migration is risky business, though, and the move to the food is replete with challenges. First of all, it takes […]

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Those epaulets! On Red-winged Blackbirds…

Even many non-birders are familiar with Red-winged Blackbirds. They breed in wet areas including cattail marshes and roadside ditches, and, as their name indicates, they’re black with red (and yellow) epaulets on their shoulders. Their song is a loud “o-kra-lee!” We’re hearing from you that there seems to be more red-wings around this year than […]

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Garden Tips: Birds need water, too

Birds need water for drinking and bathing, and the heat of summer is a good time to get your bird baths out. Drinking Birds don’t need to drink as much water as mammals do, because they don’t have sweat glands. They lose water through breathing and their poop. Most songbirds feed on insects and get […]

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Feeder interlopers – on grackles and starlings

You’ve bought and/or cleaned your feeders. You’ve taken the time to set up your feeding station to maximize the numbers of birds and bird species that might use it. You’ve purchased high-quality, non-GMO bird feed and have stocked your station. You’ve waited with excitement to see who comes to use your new arrangement. …Common Grackles […]

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Why do hummingbirds hum?

May 1st(ish) typically heralds the springtime return of hummingbirds and orioles from their southern wintering grounds. They fly far and hard to get here and benefit from whatever energetic support they can get. If you don’t already have them or want more, we carry a nice selection of oriole and hummingbird feeders. Hummingbird feeder set-up […]

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It’s a challenging time for birds. And bird lovers…

Spring migration is a physically demanding time for birds. Imagine the physicality of flying from Central or South America with the added challenges of unpredictable food sources and confusing high-rise tower lights along the way. This is a time when readily available energy can literally mean life or death. Bird feeders well-stocked with high-quality, high-fat […]

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Garden Tips: Planting for winter bird use

You’ve purchased and set up your bird feeding station, filled it with high-quality bird food, sat down by the window with your binoculars and identification guide, and… …no birds! What’s up with that? Birds need food to survive, of course, and feeders can provide them with desperately needed calories, especially in the deep cold of […]

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Garden Tips: Is feeding birds helpful to them or a hindrance?

In addition to the pleasure that comes from watching birds at a feeder, many people choose to feed birds to help them out. You may have heard the idea that birds become dependent on feeders, and we could end up harming them if we stop stocking our feeders. The scientific literature suggests this may not […]

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Winter Birdwatching Tips

There are far fewer bird species around during the winter months, which can, perhaps counterintuitively, make bird watching more enjoyable. For newcomers to birding, fewer species means a less overwhelming learning curve. Many of the species that overwinter here stay for the spring and summer, making winter a good time to establish a solid knowledge […]

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More isn’t always better… birds and windows

Can you guess how many bird species have been documented in the Peterborough region? 307! With a blend of urban areas, lakes and rivers, agricultural fields, and forests, the Peterborough area encompasses a huge variety of habitats. On top of that, we sit in an area know as “The Land Between,” the transition zone between […]

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